Greeting someone in the Philippines

If you want to greet someone in the Philippines you can do this by putting your hands together and taking a small bow. This is quite similar to a greeting in China.

If you want to say something to the person you greet here are some tips:

  • Good morning – Ma-gan-dang u-ma-ga po / Magandang Umaga po
  • Good afternoon – Magandang Tanghali po
  • Good evening – Magandang Gabi po
  • You are beautiful – Maganda Ka
  • You are from where? – Taga saan ka?
  • My name is WhizKid. – Ako po ay si Whizkid
  • I live in America – Nakatira po ako sa America
  • Take Care – Ingat po

At last, read this article of you’re greeting and showing respect to an elder (60+) you know.

Mano Po Gesture: Filipinos’ Way of Respecting The Elders

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Using the word “Po”

Po’ is a word used to show respect and humility in the Philippines. It can be used when talking to someone in higher position, someone older, or even when a person in a higher societal status wants to show respect and humble himself before an old beggar.

For foreign people, it’s also appreciated if they include ‘po’ in their statements. For example: ‘Yes’ is ‘oo’ (pronounced as oh-oh), but to sound respectful,  people made it ‘opo’. ‘No’ is ‘hindi’, but ‘hindi po’ would be better.

Where to put ‘po’ in the statement depends on the phrase or sentence but if a foreign toungue would use it, it will be better if they will have it at the end of the sentence, like, “I don’t know po”, “I will check your sms later po”, “hello po”, “how are you po” and “happy birthday po”.

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The Face a Holy Temple, Malaysia

It’s common for Westerners to give each other a hug or kiss each other in the face when you meet.

However, when in Malaysia, try to avoid touching a Malay or to kissing them in their face. The head and face are considered to be the home of the human soul. You can only shake hands if they will reach out for you to shake their hands.

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Not Write in Red in China

The color red is considered to bring luck. But there is one way the color red may not be used. Please do not write somebody’s name in the color red. This means you wish them bad luck.

In general, it’s not good to write with a red color at all. In some more conservative company cultures, it’s not done, when your boss or colleagues see you writing with a red pen.

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Give/Receive Business Card & Gifts in China with Both Hands

When given and accepting any objects (such as gifts or business cards) with both hands, it shows you are fully interested and dedicated to receive the object. This custom is relevant in China, but also in many other Asian countries.

For example, business cards are also given with both hands and thumbs up. When you’re the receiver, also accept it with both hands.

An often made mistake is to directly hide the card away. This is considered rude. The best thing is to study the card closely for a while and then put it in front of you on the table. Do not play with the card or write any details on the card. Instead, just take a careful look to remember the name and the background of the receiver.

accepting objects with both hands

Do not throw cards across table. This is considered to be very rude and disrespectful. Always handle the business card with great care and respect. After you finish the conversation pick it up and take it with you. Do not put it in your pocket directly!

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Asian Customs and Etiquettes

How to get an Asian to respect you?

The basic culture around Asia is collectivist, in other words highly interdependent, and more socialized than the European-based individualistic nations. Mannerisms stemming from this collectivist society value family, spirituality, and honor. Asian Etiquettes reflect beliefs and cultural habits that are the fabric of Asian societies. It is the way an Asian show respect to each other. It is the way they blend in and interact, showing pride in their cultures and beliefs. It is essential to know these for doing travelling and business in these counties. So if you want to be accepted as a trustworthy, credible person and good friend, you’d better forget about how you do things at home, and put in your homework on business etiquette and culture. The assumptions, values and beliefs that Asians use on a day-to-day basis are what make them tick. If you want to do travel and business in Asia, you have to follow those unconscious, subtle and often indirect rules of business.

Asian Etiquettes by country

In China, deeply rooted in society is the need to belong and conform to a unit, whether the family, a political party or an organization. The family is the focus of life for most Chinese. Age and rank are highly respected. However, to the dismay of older people, today’s young people are rapidly modernizing, wearing blue jeans and sunglasses, drinking Coke and driving motorbikes. never talk about siblings as many of the population in China are one child families and this may seem as ignorant on your part. Never talk about democracy openly as you may get arrested for conspiring against their government. There are many tribal Chinese women who must not be physically touched as that is a sign of a marriage proposal. Mostly, Chinese manners include strict discipline, bowing as greeting, and avoidance of asking about siblings

In Indonesia, Paying respect to elders and obeying teachers are expected among Asian youth, such as shown here in Indonesia. The students quietly listen to their teacher’s explanation during their school excursion.Indonesia has a Muslim majority population, and some points of etiquette in the Middle East apply. Following are some key points of Indonesian etiquette. Shaming or humiliating people in public is considered extremely rude. Always use your right hand, when shaking hands, offering a gift, handing or receiving something, eating, pointing or generally touching another person

In Malaysia, It is considered rude to wear shoes inside a house. One would usually take off shoes outside the house and leave them by the door. When shaking the hand of elders, the younger person is expected to touch the top of the elder’s palm with the tip of their nose or forehead to express respect. It is similar to kissing a hand, but only using the tip of the nose or forehead, not lips. It is considered rude to not “Salam” a person whether they are visiting you or vice versa.It is considered improper to show affection (such as kissing) ones partner or spouse in public as it is not showing modesty and piety.One usually eats with the right hand.When handing things to people use either your right hand or both hands. Not your left hand.Girls should dress modestly and not wear revealing clothing. Never say “Oi!” when calling out someone.

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Chum Reap Suor

Cambodian people greet each other by saying “Chum Reap Suor”, accompanied by a gesture of pressing their palms together in front of their face and slightly bowing forward, which is called ‘sampeah’. Your Cambodian hosts will be happily surprised to see you using the ‘sampeah’ to greet them. Shaking hands is now more and more acceptable, usually with men, and after a ‘sampeah’.

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Keeping good luck

On the New Year Day ( first day of the new year in Lunar Calendar) , do not sweep the floor/ clean house. Vietnamese believe everybody/ every household has good luck on the first day of the new year. If we sweep / clean the house/ throw out the garbage, we will lose good luck.

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Red Color Items

A Khmer Belief is that People tie red cloths on their wrist, motor handles and other type of accessories because they believe that it will bring good luck and happiness to them.
People like wearing Red Clothes on Sunday because it is believed to give them more happiness.

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Greetings in Indonesia

Guarantee you will not see many Indonesian greets each other with a kiss on a cheek or a giant hug. Indonesians respect their elderly (or people they respect, generally) by salim, which is a revering handshake by touching the back of the hand to the forehead. For example, when shaking the hand with older persons, such as parents, grandparents and teachers, the younger people or students are expected to touch the back of the elder’s palm with the tip of their nose or forehead, this reflects a special respect from the young to the old. This salim gesture is similar to hand-kissing, with exception it is only tip of nose or forehead that touch the hand, not the lips. As for the meeting new people, a hand-shake is a very common thing to do.

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Pierce Baby Girl Ears

It is a tradition in most part of Indonesia, to pierce the ears of a baby girl right after she is born or when she is still a baby. It is considered odd not to do it, since it is one main symbols of feminine applied to females. Baby girl without pierced ear will be often mistakenly considered as a baby boy.

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Disliking when Pregnant

When a woman is pregnant, she is not supposed to dislike or hate a person for whatever reason too deeply. It is believed that the baby will be born with a face (and or behavior) that really looks alike with the disliked person.

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