Greeting someone in the Philippines

If you want to greet someone in the Philippines you can do this by putting your hands together and taking a small bow. This is quite similar to a greeting in China.

If you want to say something to the person you greet here are some tips:

  • Good morning – Ma-gan-dang u-ma-ga po / Magandang Umaga po
  • Good afternoon – Magandang Tanghali po
  • Good evening – Magandang Gabi po
  • You are beautiful – Maganda Ka
  • You are from where? – Taga saan ka?
  • My name is WhizKid. – Ako po ay si Whizkid
  • I live in America – Nakatira po ako sa America
  • Take Care – Ingat po

At last, read this article of you’re greeting and showing respect to an elder (60+) you know.

Mano Po Gesture: Filipinos’ Way of Respecting The Elders

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Using the word “Po”

Po’ is a word used to show respect and humility in the Philippines. It can be used when talking to someone in higher position, someone older, or even when a person in a higher societal status wants to show respect and humble himself before an old beggar.

For foreign people, it’s also appreciated if they include ‘po’ in their statements. For example: ‘Yes’ is ‘oo’ (pronounced as oh-oh), but to sound respectful,  people made it ‘opo’. ‘No’ is ‘hindi’, but ‘hindi po’ would be better.

Where to put ‘po’ in the statement depends on the phrase or sentence but if a foreign toungue would use it, it will be better if they will have it at the end of the sentence, like, “I don’t know po”, “I will check your sms later po”, “hello po”, “how are you po” and “happy birthday po”.

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The Face a Holy Temple, Malaysia

It’s common for Westerners to give each other a hug or kiss each other in the face when you meet.

However, when in Malaysia, try to avoid touching a Malay or to kissing them in their face. The head and face are considered to be the home of the human soul. You can only shake hands if they will reach out for you to shake their hands.

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Not Write in Red in China

The color red is considered to bring luck. But there is one way the color red may not be used. Please do not write somebody’s name in the color red. This means you wish them bad luck.

In general, it’s not good to write with a red color at all. In some more conservative company cultures, it’s not done, when your boss or colleagues see you writing with a red pen.

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Give/Receive Business Card & Gifts in China with Both Hands

When given and accepting any objects (such as gifts or business cards) with both hands, it shows you are fully interested and dedicated to receive the object. This custom is relevant in China, but also in many other Asian countries.

For example, business cards are also given with both hands and thumbs up. When you’re the receiver, also accept it with both hands.

An often made mistake is to directly hide the card away. This is considered rude. The best thing is to study the card closely for a while and then put it in front of you on the table. Do not play with the card or write any details on the card. Instead, just take a careful look to remember the name and the background of the receiver.

accepting objects with both hands

Do not throw cards across table. This is considered to be very rude and disrespectful. Always handle the business card with great care and respect. After you finish the conversation pick it up and take it with you. Do not put it in your pocket directly!

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Marriage Practices of the Kankanaey Tribe in Northern Philippines

Marriage from courtship to post – marriage activities is a community undertaking in the Kinali culture.

Pre-marriage activities ensures the compatibility of soon-to-be partners in the Kinali community, and once united are expected to become productivemembers of society.

Kinali tribal courtships starts with the anag. Bachelors, after the farm works return to their villages, and take their rest at the dap-ay. From thence forth, they will make the customary journey into the olog, the designated dormitory for young girls and unmarried ladies of the village. Stories commence into the night, with the bachelors doing everything they can to woo the ladies into their side.

At times, farm works are required of the ladies to test the mettle and determination of the bachelors. These includes, but are not limited to pounding rice with mortar and pestle, gathering of firewood for the girl’s family, fetching water, carrying rice grains from the farms to the abode of the girl, and even looking after the cattle and livestock.

Every available methods are employed to test the soon to be member of the family, it include the observance of his character as well as values and attitudes.

At times, when bachelors have passed marrying age, of which is often nearing the mid-forties, the elders of the community perform the sagut. The sagut, is the traditional practice of pairing bachelors with spinsters, and at times younger girls even half their age. The idea for the latter, is for the girl to take care of the aging bachelor at old age. The consummation of such requires the approval of both parties, and the families should be amenable to the agreement.

Sukat the makan follows once the partners agreed to get married. This is the traditional practice of exchanging food, usually sweet potatoes and meat, between the families. In the old days, when the belief on tala (witchcraft and sorcery) and, kedet (food poisoning) was still prevalent, there is a need to established trusting relationships between families, thus the purpose of the sukat di makan.

Other practices includes the:

Daw-es – cleansing ritual

Begans – thanks giving ritual

Dawak – Traditional wedding

Senga – thanks giving party

Sekad di Gameng – passing of the inheritance during the wedding night

Bab-a-at – claiming of traditional gifts from relatives of neighboring villages

Bakid – the closing ritual to end the festivities

Summer festival(Ayyoweng di Lambak ed Tadian) a call to a big celebration in Tadian,Mountain Province,Philippines,March 5,2011-The Kankanaey Tribes of Tadian Mountain Provinces clad in their colorful traditonal ethnic wear featuring the evolution of their native costumes from ancient time when barks of trees and plants were used as clothing material to the advent of cotton wherein colorful traditional ethnic designs are still beinbg used to the present time.the festival is three day celebration of traditional ethnic dances,music and merry making celebrated during summer after a bountiful rice harvest.

 

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Chum Reap Suor

Cambodian people greet each other by saying “Chum Reap Suor”, accompanied by a gesture of pressing their palms together in front of their face and slightly bowing forward, which is called ‘sampeah’. Your Cambodian hosts will be happily surprised to see you using the ‘sampeah’ to greet them. Shaking hands is now more and more acceptable, usually with men, and after a ‘sampeah’.

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Keeping good luck

On the New Year Day ( first day of the new year in Lunar Calendar) , do not sweep the floor/ clean house. Vietnamese believe everybody/ every household has good luck on the first day of the new year. If we sweep / clean the house/ throw out the garbage, we will lose good luck.

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Red Color Items

A Khmer Belief is that People tie red cloths on their wrist, motor handles and other type of accessories because they believe that it will bring good luck and happiness to them.
People like wearing Red Clothes on Sunday because it is believed to give them more happiness.

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Greetings in Indonesia

Guarantee you will not see many Indonesian greets each other with a kiss on a cheek or a giant hug. Indonesians respect their elderly (or people they respect, generally) by salim, which is a revering handshake by touching the back of the hand to the forehead. For example, when shaking the hand with older persons, such as parents, grandparents and teachers, the younger people or students are expected to touch the back of the elder’s palm with the tip of their nose or forehead, this reflects a special respect from the young to the old. This salim gesture is similar to hand-kissing, with exception it is only tip of nose or forehead that touch the hand, not the lips. As for the meeting new people, a hand-shake is a very common thing to do.

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Pierce Baby Girl Ears

It is a tradition in most part of Indonesia, to pierce the ears of a baby girl right after she is born or when she is still a baby. It is considered odd not to do it, since it is one main symbols of feminine applied to females. Baby girl without pierced ear will be often mistakenly considered as a baby boy.

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Disliking when Pregnant

When a woman is pregnant, she is not supposed to dislike or hate a person for whatever reason too deeply. It is believed that the baby will be born with a face (and or behavior) that really looks alike with the disliked person.

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